Nike’s #makeitcount Campaign – The power of the brand and social media

The world’s biggest sporting brand has launched it’s annual campaign driven by the force of social media. All athletes, including runners have been asked to tell Nike and the rest of the world how they are going to “make 2013 count”. The campaign, endorsed by a number of Olympic and world athletes and titled with the infamous Twitter hashtag has attracted thousands to sign up. Motivational images such as the ones below are leading the movement to encourage athletes to sign up and connect with the rest of the world about their sporting goal for the next 12 months.

Take a look to see how the running community got together in New York for #makeitcount 2012 last year (how I would’ve loved to have been there!). It portrays so well the power of the Nike brand and as well how social media in isolation has it’s own power to bring people with similar interests together.

The#makeitcount campaign doesn’t just involve athletes to pledge their sporting goals for this year, it gives a general message of doing something more active with your life. This has been introduced to coincide with the release of the Nike+ fuel band which retails at around £129 and basically tracks how “fuelled” up you are on activity (and adrenalin). Take a look at this amazing video, made by Casey Neistate, an American film producer about how he is making this year count:

(My heart literally stopped when he jumped from that waterfall)

Casey’s video which is full of energy and motivation is exactly the kind of marketing Nike have so successfully involved themselves with. Marketing and positioning of a brand has become ever more essential in the age of the social media revolution and the citizen journalist. Making their brand about people and experiences and allowing them to share those in a world wide community rather than another dreary product focused advertising campaign is something Nike has perfected over the past decade.

Few more #makeitcount pacts from Nike’s Facebook page:

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However, Nike have not lost sight of the importance of high quality products and the way these are marketed and released has also proven vital to their success. The introduction of their Nike Free trainer just as the phenomenon of minimal and barefoot running started to take off is a clever and successful move.

They have managed to consistently make their profits rise year on year – they recorded a $24.1 billion revenue in 2012 and adapting their products to fall in line with changing trends and fashion has proven to be the magical formula to ensure this keeps happening. How even after thirty years and in a global economic downturn, people continue buying Nike gear and everyone wants to be seen in it is a massive achievement. And I don’t see it changing any time soon. Bravo Nike.
Will you be #makingitcount this year?

Happy Running.

K

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First run of the year

So the first run of the year is out of the way and I thought i’d share it with you.  It took a good few days to pluck up the courage after the Christmas binge. I wasn’t too hard on myself route wise as I knew it was going to be a tough one.

I ran a quick half an hour 5k from Penarth Marina across the barrage to Cardiff Bay and back.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I wrapped up pretty warm with Nike thermal leggings, a Nike thermal long sleeve top, a Dri-Fit jacket, my new reflective Nike gloves and fleece headband. The temperature wasn’t as low as I thought it was and about half way through I took off my gloves. It’s surprising how much you cool down when the air can get to your hands!

I ran about 7pm when it was pretty much pitch black so having reflective gear on was pretty essential as part of the run was along a narrow road. Although the barrage is brightly lit almost all of the way, it’s quite hard to see the ground. There is a lane for bicycles which isn’t lit and a walkers route where the spotlights are. I ran along the walkers route as there wasn’t too many people around. Although I couldn’t see exactly where my feet were it didn’t put me off as the barrage is all pedestrianised so I wasn’t worried about ditches or potholes.

It felt good to be back on the road after a few weeks off. The temperature was perfect for the first run as it wasn’t too windy or cold but I had a nice breeze on my face. This is the first time I’ve covered this route exactly and I’ll definitely be doing it again. There is a great view right across Cardiff Bay and you are often accompanied by other runners.

Having the luxury of not having to stand pissed at traffic lights which you often have to do when city running (especially in Cardiff) is great but the run wasn’t completely uninterrupted…the barrage was up and I had to wait a good 5 minutes for it to let the boat through and lower back down. Not great when I was 10 minutes into the run and just warming up. It wasn’t all bad though, certainly no where near as annoying as hundreds of traffic light stops…so I took some random barage viewphotos for you whilst I was waiting…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I ran in my new Nike Frees for only the second time as the weather has been so bad here and I can only run in them when it’s dry. There is a lot less support in them than my Asics but they are so much lighter and as long as you keep on flat smooth ground you won’t have any problems. I loved running in them but as there is hardly anything in them you can feel everything and towards the end of the route my ankles started to ache slightly but I think that’s because my feet are used to my other trainers. A few more goes in them and I should  be right as rain.

So all in all a good run and I’m feeling confident about my fitness for this year.

A quick music suggestion – I had this song on loop for most of the run and it’s definitely up there as one of my top songs of 2012. With a highly appropriate title here’s Jessie Ware’s Running (Disclosure Remix)…

Happy Running!

K

Running in 2013

We all have new year’s resolutions and probably about 70-80% of our aspirations next year will be to do with fitness.

With Christmas just a week away, everybody will be indulging in christmassy food and drink and enjoying every minute of it. Everyone needs a break don’t they?

But what I think the problem is with new year’s resolutions is people get too carried away. New Years Day at your local park will be buzzing with newly committed runners. It’s a great thing to see but I bet you half of those people won’t be there the same time next week.

Of course, the first run is always the worst. After a few miles, the sickness feeling sets in, the breathing gets heavier and you feel like you couldn’t possibly take another step. That’s fine. Don’t. Turn around and go home. At least you made the effort of getting up and going in the first place!

In a few days once your body has recovered from that awful experience, try the same distance again. It can be very easy to push yourself too much to the point when the sheer thought of running can make you squirm. Even the most professional runners sometimes don’t know when to stop.

Just be realistic about it and after a few tries it will become easier and you will start to have enjoyable experiences of running and not the throwing up in the bush on the way home ones!

Keeping a running journal is a good idea especially if you have an end goal. Be honest in there, if you only ran half of what you wanted to run one day, write it down and you’ll soon start to see patterns. Maybe you’re a better runner in the evening than in the morning or maybe you run better on one route than another.

Another suggestion would be to sign up for an event. But this can be risky. You sign up for a marathon tell all your friends you’re doing it and then realise it’s too much. Again, be realistic about your training and performance.

A 5k park run perhaps would be a good place to start. Visit www.parkrun.org.uk to find out what’s going on in your local area – they have some great fun races over Christmas and it was founded by Phil Cook, a long serving member of Les Croupiers in Cardiff!

Finding a local running group is also a great way to stay motivated in running. Nike launched it’s own “free running” club last year – all powered by social media. Take a look at their Facebook page and there is one right here in Cardiff. You can choose from running with mixed or women based groups only and you can choose your distance AND it’s free! Perfect for many of us who will be completely strapped for cash after Christmas. Check out their promo video:

Have a great Christmas all and happy running!

K

 

The dark side of running

It is called many things – over exercising, extreme endurance, compulsive exercising.

The “running high” as it is known, manifests itself after about an hour of training. The body produces endorphins, a type of natural morphine and the immense feeling of pleasure is what can make people wanting more.

As popular as running has become over the last few decades, is there a threshold where long distance running can become too dangerous?

After speaking at length to professional runners in South Wales, the reasons why they took up the sport in the first place and why older runners are still doing it now was mainly for two reasons: fitness and competition. But what I noticed among them, was a recurring concern – that running can become an addiction – and it’s a very easy and sometimes dangerous trap to fall into.

The Science Stuff

US cardiologists have just released a study which claims that intense physical activity can serve as a positive alternative to heroin. The scientists saw a dramatic 50% reduction in rats’ need for heroin once exercise became a daily activity. This, of course, is a good thing.

But what about if you stopped running? Would you get the same withdrawal symptoms as a drug addict would? The experts say yes.

Interestingly, this study led by Dr Kanarek at Tufts University claimed that an “intense running regimen” and opiate abuse have the same biochemical effect on the body, and that the rats which ran harder, experienced stronger withdrawal symptoms. Not only can it lead to mental withdrawals, but it can also damage your body more than improving it. Another study only released a few days ago, claims that marathon running can create long term heart defects and endurance training should be limited to one hour a day (just as the “running high” kicks in) – anything over that, apparently, can “produce diminishing returns”.

The Marathon Culture

I spoke with Jane, a 53 year old woman who has been running for almost thirty years. Jane founded the Cardiff Woman’s Running Network in Penarth in 2006 and is a long-serving member of Wales’ largest running club, Les Croupiers. Despite being a professional racer, track runner and competing for Wales & the World Cup in fell running, she has never run a marathon in her life.

Club track 3000m winnersJane has managed to maintain her running obsession as a positive influence on her life. She told me she wants to “preserve what she’s got” and doesn’t want to trash her body by competing in marathons. “It’s all about experience”, Jane says and people do not realise there are many different areas of running you can explore other than marathons. Park runs are an alternative to having the race day experience without the added pressure of a long distance race.

Bath Gwent League November

Building your stamina and mental awareness of something like the London marathon, is something even Jane is not yet entirely comfortable with. Jane believes she wouldn’t be running today if she didn’t have an eight year break from running due to an injury and bringing up a child and this is what saved her health.

So is it really addiction? Or is it just dependency? People run for social reasons too. And as Jane told me if she stopped running, it would leave a huge hole in her life.

But, hearing one man’s story of how his running addiction forced him to give up what he loved altogether because he became so obsessed does make you sit back and think about it a little bit harder.

Sean, also ran for Les Croupiers. He used to run on average, 26 miles a day – 140 miles a week. Listen to his astonishing story below:

Beating myself was all that mattered

ad·dic·tion n.

1.

a. Compulsive physiological and psychological need for a habit-forming substance

The definition in itself carries negative connotations and most would argue there are worse things you could be addicted to.

We all know exercise is good for you. But some runners are on the treadmill and they can’t get off or are on the road that keeps on going. Why this is, is a point of conjecture. Is it personal psyche? Is it pressure of competition? Is it the fact that everybody has to do a marathon these days? Once upon a time, to say you’d done a marathon was enough. Now, people say what time did you do?

Advances in training technology have also enabled runners to be more aware of their performance. Applications such as Nike+ that fit in your trainer and track your running distance without you having to really do anything at all are widely used by runners all over the globe. Being able to upload your progress on social networking sites and measure yourself against other people’s performance has created a global community of competition. Calculate. Compare. Compete is their slogan. Competition is good – but new tech tools like Nike+ focus on how you ran one day and how to do better the next – is this how exercise should really be measured?

Running is one of the few sports that has no closed season. Football, rugby, cricket all have enforced periods when the sport is not played.

The sheer simplicity of running is it’s greatest appeal, but for some, it can also be the greatest downfall…

Please join in this conversation about the dark side of running. Feel free to comment below and please answer the poll. I would love to hear what you think.

Ultimate City Running in Cardiff

A geat place to run in Cardiff is the Taff Trail. It’s a 55 mile long route starting at the Roald Dahl Plass Cardiff Bay and runs right through to Brecon in Mid Wales. The scenic trail is very popular for runners and cyclists whatever the season.

Unlike any other running route I know in my local area, the Taff Trail offers a mix of both country and city running. You can follow the river Taff right into Cardiff City Centre and pass all the sites such as the Millennium Stadium, Cardiff railway station and Glamorgan cricket club on your way.

About 8 miles north, the route will take you up to historic Castell Coch. It’s quite a strenuous part of the journey but once you reach the top, the view of Cardiff and the surrounding area is breath taking.

This is a long run (and you also have to run underneath a motorway) so if you think you one way is enough for you, there is a bus you can get on in Cardiff (Tongwynlais bus) and run home from the Castle or vice versa.

The good thing about the Taff Trail is that you can customize your routes along the way whether you want a good couple of hours pounding the pavements or a short 20 minute run before work.

Start off at different land marks like the one I do on a regular basis. It’s easy to change the routes up by starting at Cardiff Bay into the city centre or going from the bottom end of the centre (Sophia Gardens) and run north towards Castell Coch – stopping once you reach Radyr or Llandaff.

Sophia Gardens Cricket Club – Hailey Park, Llandaff North.

If you want to get straight into your run and don’t want to go too far out, here is my ultimate city running route:

The Taff Trail officially starts here (and so does my route), the Celtic Ring at the base of Roald Dahls Plass, it is often a busy area particularly on weekends and a good monument to start at.

Start of the Taff Trail

Running north through the oval basin and a quick jog down James St and onto Clarence Road, you will reach the Taff Trail. The track will take you north, a straight run up past the Millennium Stadium until you reach Bute Park.

It will take you about 45 minutes to run the whole thing depending on your pace and fitness level. As it’s along the Taff Trail, you’ll always be passing other runners. Good from a safety perspective and also from a motivational perspective.

Please feel free to contribute to these maps or suggest any other routes you think are good around Cardiff.

Happy running!

K